NewsHans' BiographyTeam (Present & Past)DiscographyMediaArchivesJukeboxFan CoversAbout/Feedback
 SEARCH
 

 FAN COMMENTS
@superultramega It’s funny you should say that about Rogue One because, even though I do like the themes, I will agree that it definitely is weaker than any Star Wars score and seems to lack the life Giacchino normally puts into his music.<br><br>Even weirder, his music for Jupiter Ascending (another big space opera) is far more aggressive and developed, and probably one of his best. It makes me wonder if the Star Wars team wanted the safe route....Ok, not restraint on drums, but I still don't really see how exactly his music for animated films comes even close to being an RC product. When I think of RC I think of the music for the Pirates movies, the early Bay and Bruckheimer films, etc. The work on Shrek, Antz, Ice Age, and How to Train Your Dragon is much closer to a traditional Williams score than any RC product. <br><br>Plus he's working on Star Wars so he's obviously going to try his damnedest to stick to that kind of music, and to avoid the Zimmer style. I just don't understand why you think Powell, of all people is going to be the one to dilute the Star Wars sound. <br><br>Hell, I think Giacchino's score for Rogue One was pretty much nothing more than an unmemorable, and bland version of Star Wars with very little going on besides broken down notes of the Star Wars theme playing and generic Williams copy. Just like Jurassic World. I don't know how Giacchino makes Williams' style bland but he finds a way. At least with Powell we'll get more style and memorability on top of a Williams imitation.Restraint on drums? <br><br>Have you listened to Green Zone? The Bourne movies? Hancock?<br><br>Cmon...Yeah he's not Zimmer, but this isn't a Williams product we are talking about. It's an RC product. This is what I am talking about.People like Harry Gregson, Jablonsky and Zanelli, despite their melodic tendinsies, would be people chosen for going the Zimmer route. I think Jablonsky's is the closest to Star Wars but even then there's a ton of power themes, and Zimmer hallmarks that keep him away from this sort of style. <br><br>Powell is the last person I would associate with Zimmer. His techniques are very much in vain with the Williams-like composers, like Alexandre Desplat and Michael Giacchino. The complex underscore, the rapid notes, the restraint on drums, instrument variety, the jazz techniques, etc. He's the perfect RCP composer for the job.Of all RCP members, I think he is the one closest to Williams and Star Wars sound, so I think this score will be pure orchestral fun, like most of his scores usually are.<br><br>I cannot wait to listen to it!
Well, I guess that is a matter of tastes and opinion, because for me scores like The Incredibles or Up, for saying some examples, are classics inside the animation field.<br><br>But is fine. We have our own preferences and that's okay.Me too! Very fun and « guilty pleasure » score<br>After listening to this one and Todo Mal, I think Andrew is a really versatile composer, both scores are really entertaining and yet have nothing to do with each otherI like this score, altough i think it will fly (get it) under the radar..<br>Hope Andrew continues making scores like thisIMO, though Powell was Hans'protegee 20 years ago, he always had his very own style. And this style evolved so much through these decades you can't really connect any more his mannerisms to those of people at RCP!You can't call Powell "the Zimmer route". He's written some of the densest, flashiest orchestral film music of the last 10+ years!
And how is that a bad thing? :-p<br>John Powell is an excellent choice to have both a big sounding and fun RCP score, and an orchestral one which would fit with the previously established style.Cant say Im 100% invested.....<br><br>This will be the first Star Wars score to go the Zimmer route...Well maybe you guys are right, to be honest i never cared much about this composer. All i know is that i almost never noticed any kind of theme when watching movies scored by him, while usually I'm the kind of audience who pays attention to the music. It can be that his way of writing or orchestrating or mixing doesnt match with my own taste, that's a possibility. Anyway I still maintain that none of his scores or themes has become a "classic", despite the ridiculous amount of major blockbusters he had the chance to score so far...home is very very soothing. (i sound like i have said it before lol) 
<br>
<br>it’s the one cue i can listen to a zillion times and never get tired of. i hope upcoming movies will give Hans or whoever in remote control an opportunity to do similar cues. elisabeth in inferno is the closest but is so short.
<br>
<br>i have mellowed. i love these mellow cues.John Powell stated on his Instagram that the album will have 19 tracks, and be over an hour!
Its not a film, its an album. This was still during the days of Hans' involvement with 'The Buggles'.I don't think you have listened to the Star Trek scores properly. Giacchino has a main theme that he uses a lot, but also a theme for Spock, themes for the bad guys of each movie and even a theme for the city of Yorktown in the third movie.<br><br>Another great example of this is LOST, where almost all the characters had a theme that played through all the series and there were also themes for locations or even situations.<br><br>So I don't think Giacchino is out of the use of themes.I mean sure, but I can't think of many Giacchino scores that actually match that description. The Star Trek reboot scores for example, where he has a (pretty good) main theme that he plays the same way roughly sixteen thousand times over and over again. :pFor me, a theme is a distinguishable motif or piece of music that is related to a specific location, event or most commonly character, and that the viewer notices as such. If your score contains 20 themes that are never repeated in a similar form and are so uncharacteristic that they all sound the same, I'm just calling that orchestra noise. And I don't see any appeal in that kind of scoring...Ds, am I reading that correctly that you're using the fact that JJ works with Giacchino as evidence that the score might *not* be melodic or thematic? Because say what you want about Giacchino (and I'm far from his biggest fan either), it's an objective fact that he writes film music that is almost exclusively thematic/melodic. Whether you like those themes and melodies is another question, but they are undeniably themes and melodies.
Latest

Please install Flash®
and turn on Javascript.


Rate those CD:
Top 50





  2017, February 15  updated by Nicolas
Planet Earth II Theme song Performed Live at the LATE SHOW

Yesterday, Hans Zimmer and his co-composers, Jacob Shea and Jasha Klebe of Bleeding Fingers Music, performed the BBC America theme of 'Planet Earth II.'





The dream team behind the scenes at The Late Show with Stephen Colbert ! Mike Gunton, Executive Producer of #PlanetEarth2,
with composers Jacob Shea, Hans Zimmer, Jasha Klebe and #BleedingFingers CEO Russell Emanuel !
Credit Photo : Bleeding fingers Music





Create Topic

Herb reply Replies: 0 || 2017-03-06 08:33:34
Wahnsinn, Hans du hast es einfach soooo drauf!

Dimitris Krommidas reply Replies: 0 || 2017-02-16 17:53:30
Great!

Michael Poleschuck reply Replies: 0 || 2017-02-16 04:55:22
Yeah! That's a rock, baby!

 HANS-ZIMMER.com© 2001-2017 OST 
Planet Earth 2 at the Late Show