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My one hope is that this doesn't mean Chris Nolan will be tying Zimmer's hands behind his back for future scores. If he wants to do that here, okay. I can get over one score. But I hope Nolan doesn't keep calling for this non-melodic approach.That was one of my favorites, wish it was on the OST.Yeah, was also looking for that track.Nolan's liner notes, which explains a lot on the score :<br><br>"British people are raised on the story of Dunkirk. The events of the evacuation are sacred ground, not to be ventured onto without great care. Daunting for a filmmaker. But the things that place Dunkirk so firmly at the heart of a nation's self-image are the very qualities that make it one of the greatest stories in human history. Irresistible to a filmmaker.<br><br>This film required a remarkable creative team, and Hans Zimmer, as well as having been a valued member in the past, knows how to assemble his own great team. From our first meeting, where I described to the percussionist, Satnam Ramgotra, the unusual rhythmic structure of the script and how it needed to be amplified by the music, through the finishing touches applied by Lorne Balfe during our last weeks of mixing, the importance of teamwork was paramount. The process nicely echoed the circumstances of the events we were trying to honour- a triumph of communal effort, not individual heroism.<br><br>When I called Hans one night with a one word suggestion- "Nimrod", I wasn't sure he'd accept experimenting with an existing theme for the climax of the film. To my surprise, he knew just who to call to achieve the deconstruction of Elgar's monumental theme, a theme as beloved to the English as Dunkirk itself, often played at ceremonial occasions and funerals. It's a theme which (I never admitted to Hans) I am incapable of hearing without feeling the surprising weight of my father's coffin on my shoulder. Hans brought in Benjamin Wallfisch, who, in collaboration with the great music editor Alex Gibson and myself, fashioned a modern reworking that grows out of the sights and sounds of the movie- tapping the original's resonances without feeling unearned. Hans's brass accents complete the piece's power to move without sentimentalizing.<br><br>Hans went on to incorporate Elgar's theme elsewhere in the score, a score that on this album has been divided into cues, but which in the film plays as one long piece with a unifying and complex rhythmic and tonal structure. The structure of the screenplay itself builds upon the shepherd tone concepts I first explored with composer David Julyan in the soundtrack for "The Prestige", but here Zimmer's team (in particular Andy Page and Andrew Kawczynski) and I added a whole new rhythmical structure. This can't be fully represented on the album, but in the film it is able to integrate sound effects and even story structure into the very fabric of the music in a new and unique manner.<br><br>The rigid structure, to which we adamntly stuck, at times proved frustrating for the musicians, but they persevered and produced extraordinary cues based on unusual solutions (such as a recording of my watch that Hans and his team adapted into many different rhythmic voices). The disciplined procedural approach stopped the music for "Dunkirk" from ever resorting to arbitrary cinematic emotionalism, something Hans and I always felt was vital, given the inherent emotional heft of the real life events. This has been a long and hard journey, but I am proud of the final results, and hope that you will share my appreciation for the talent of the artists who worked so hard for so long on this score.<br><br>CHRISTOPHER NOLANI don't think emotion and melodies = Oscar worthy. Dunkirk's score fits in with the movie far better than Chappie.
Saw the film again last night and there are a ton of great cues missing, especially from the first half of the film. It's a crime the cue when they carry the stretcher onto the ship wasn't included.The answer is: Christopher Nolan ;-)It doesn't crossfade as much as, say, The Dark Knight Rises or Inception, but there is  very rarely dead air. I haven't listened enough times to determine when it does and doesn't crossfade, but the tracks are, at least, very closely edited together.I Love Hans' stuff but this score didn't really do it for me. I don't see how people are repping this as Oscar worthy but trash something like CHAPPiEs score, something with actual emotion and melodies.This soundtrack will win an oscar . It's great to see Balfe back with Zimmer. Dream team
Does anyone know whether the cd version actually has the cues crossfading into each other? Since in the film the score plays almost as an entire cue, it would have made sense if they did that. It sounds like some cues in the digital version end kind of awkwardly, like 'Impulse' and 'Home'. These cues fade out while there still seems to be some instrumentation progression going on. Hence the crossfade thought...Oooh credits. I'm guessing from these it's going to be disqualified from entering Oscar nominations because<br>1. Use of a classical musical piece throughout<br>2. More than one guy is credited.<br><br>Anyway, that's how Hans always liked, crediting everyone.I have to agree on the soundtrack being mostly unlistenable...<br><br>This is nothing like Inception, or even Interstellar.<br><br>I seriously doubt there's going to be a big stink made about any track from this score the likes of "No Time For Caution" back in 14...<br><br>I tried...I tried real hard to find something to keep me interested in this score, but I personally couldn't find anything. Most of it is tension building noise. I'm sure it's great within the film, but outside the film? Not so much.<br><br>I guess Zimmer is on "retirement mode" now...He's slowing down and not wanting to produce the rockin stuff that he used to...I can't blame him, but still...This score sounds like a total experiment.Sorry bud...<br><br>Its not.Hi everyone, does anyone know the name of the music in the Dunkirk Trailer 1 at 01:30? It doesn't not seem to be in the score, I'm assuming it's not in the movie, I'm going to see it Sunday. If anyone knows the music or where to find it, please Comment, thanks!
Tina had a lot of work to do here!Each time I listen to "The Oil," I'm convinced it can't get any louder and larger, but it does. If you don't look at the track time, you're just constantly thinking it's about to end, and yet it somehow continues to up the ante until you almost can't handle anymore!I was on three concerts so far and just at the one at Frankfurt some band members came down from the stage after the concert. I didn'f got a autograph but I did photos with nile marr and nick glennie smith. But if you would ask some of the band members I am sure they will say "ok perhaps I can arrange it" would try it this way :)I really like it. It's a clever score that sounds like it had an awful lot of thought put into it.A fanmade.<br><br>Hybrid probably took the track from here because the guy behind the channel was stating that it was original without being. Leaving the link here would only give him more audience.
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Mini biography from IMDB

German-born composer Hans Zimmer is recognized as one of Hollywood’s most innovative musical talents‚ having first enjoyed success in the world of pop music as a member of The Buggles. The group’s single Video Killed the Radio Star became a worldwide hit and helped usher in a new era of global entertainment as the first music video to be aired on MTV.

Zimmer entered the world of film music in London during a long collaboration with famed composer and mentor Stanley Myers‚ which included the film My Beautiful Laundrette. He soon began work on several successful solo projects‚ including the critically acclaimed A World Apart‚ and during these years Zimmer pioneered the use of combining old and new musical technologies. Today‚ this work has earned him the reputation of being the father of integrating the electronic musical world with traditional orchestral arrangements.

A turning point in Zimmer’s career came in 1988 when he was asked to score Rain Man for director Barry Levinson. The film went on to win the Oscar for Best Picture of the Year and earned Zimmer his first Academy Award Nomination for Best Original Score. The next year‚ Zimmer composed the score for another Best Picture Oscar recipient‚ Driving Miss Daisy‚ starring Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman.

Having already scored two Best Picture winners‚ in the early ’90s Zimmer cemented his position as a pre-eminent talent with the award-winning score for The Lion King. The soundtrack has sold over 15 million copies to date and earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Score‚ a Golden Globe‚ an American Music Award‚ a Tony and two Grammy Awards. In total‚ Zimmer’s work has been nominated for 7 Golden Globes‚ 7 Grammys and seven Oscars for “Rainman”‚ “Gladiator”‚ “The Lion King”‚ “As good As It Gets”‚ “The Preachers Wife”‚ “The Thin Red Line‚” “The Prince Of Egypt” and “The Last Samurai.”

With his career in full swing‚ Zimmer was anxious to replicate the mentoring experience he had benefited from under Stanley Myers’ guidance. With state-of-the-art technology and a supportive creative environment‚ Zimmer was able to offer film-scoring opportunities to young composers at his Santa Monica-based musical ’think tank.’ This approach helped launch the careers of such notable composers as Mark Mancina‚ John Powell‚ Harry Gregson-Williams‚ Nick Glennie-Smith and Klaus Badelt.

In 2000 Zimmer scored the music for Gladiator‚ for which he received an Oscar nomination‚ in addition to Golden Globe and Broadcast Film Critics Awards for his epic score. It sold more than three million copies worldwide and spawned a second album “Gladiator: More Music From The Motion Picture‚” released on the Universal Classics/Decca label. Zimmer’s other scores that year included Mission: Impossible 2‚ The Road To El Dorado and An Everlasting Piece‚ directed by Barry Levinson.

Some of his other impressive scores include Pearl Harbor‚ The Ring‚4 films directed by Ridley Scott; Matchstick Men‚ Hannibal‚ Black Hawk Down and Thelma & Louise‚ Penny Marshall’s Riding In Cars With Boys and A League Of Their Own‚ Quentin Tarantino’s True Romance‚ Tears Of The Sun‚ Ron Howard’s Backdraft‚ Days Of Thunder‚ Smilla’s Sense Of Snow and the animated Spirit: Stallion Of The Cimarron for which he also co-wrote four of the songs with Bryan Adams‚ including the Golden Globe nominated “Here I Am.”

At the 27th annual Flanders International Film Festival‚ Zimmer performed live for the first time in concert with a 100-piece orchestra and a 100-piece choir. Choosing selections from his impressive body of work‚ Zimmer performed newly orchestrated concert versions of Gladiator‚ Mission: Impossible 2‚ Rain Man‚ The Lion King‚ and The Thin Red Line. The concert was recorded by Decca and released as a concert album entitled "The Wings Of A Film: The Music Of Hans Zimmer."

In 2003‚ Zimmer completed his 100th film score for the film The Last Samurai‚ starring Tom Cruise‚ for which he received both a Golden Globe and a Broadcast Film Critics nomination. Over the past year‚ Zimmer has scored Nancy Meyers’ comedy Something’s Gotta Give‚ the animated Dreamworks film‚ A Shark’s Tale (featuring voices of Will Smith‚ Renee Zellweger‚ Robert De Niro‚ Jack Black and Martin Scorsese)‚ and most recently‚ Jim Brooks’ Spanglish starring Adam Sandler and Tea Leoni (for which he also received a Golden Globe nomination). His upcoming projects include Paramount’s Weatherman starring Nicolas Cage‚ Dreamworks’ Madagascar and highly anticipated Warner Bros. summer release‚ Batman Begins.

Zimmer’s additional honors and awards include the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award in Film Composition from the National Board of Review‚ and the Frederick Loewe Award in 2003 at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. He has also received ASCAP’s Henry Mancini Award for Lifetime Achievement. Hans and his wife live in Los Angeles and he is the father of 4.


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